WHAT IS PROFESSIONAL COUNSELING?

Professional counseling is a professional relationship that empowers diverse individuals, families, and groups to accomplish mental health, wellness, education, and career goals.

Counseling is a collaborative effort between the counselor and client. Professional counselors help clients identify goals and potential solutions to problems which cause emotional turmoil; seek to improve communication and coping skills; strengthen self-esteem; and promote behavior change and optimal mental health.

We hope to provide a source of relief (Rahma) and help through our wide variety of approaches and professionals.

  • Professional counseling or psychotherapy (MFT, LPCC, PSYD)
  • Spiritual counseling (based mainly on spirituality and theology)
  • Pastoral counseling or psycho-spiritual approach (Combines psychotherapy with spirituality)
  • Mediation and family arbitration (Professional Mediators)
    • In Development (not currently available with the Rahma Counseling Center)

WHAT QUALIFIES AN INDIVIDUAL TO BE A PROFESSIONAL COUNSELOR?

Professional counselors are trained in the field of counseling and clinical psychology with at least a Master’s degree and supervised training hours (it takes 3000 supervised hours to become licensed as a Marriage and Family Therapist). Counselors work with clients on strategies to overcome obstacles and personal challenges that they are facing.

WHAT IS A LICENSED THERAPIST, AN ASSOCIATE, AND A TRAINEE?

All licensed therapists have completed their graduate or professional degrees, their required number of supervised clinical hours, and they have successfully completed the required exams by the California State Boards that govern their profession.

Associates have completed their graduate or professional degrees, and they are completing the clinical training hours required by the licensing board. All of their clinical work is supervised by licensed therapists, who have been licensed for at least two years.

Trainees have completed at least one year of their graduate or professional program and are completing the required number of clinical hours needed to complete their degree. All of their clinical work is supervised by licensed therapists, who have been licensed for at least two years.

IS EVERYTHING THAT IS DISCLOSED IN COUNSELING CONFIDENTIAL?

Most everything discussed in counseling is confidential, however, there are a limited number of situations that therapists are legally required to report.

  1. Any form of child abuse or neglect.
  2. Any form of elder abuse or neglect.
  3. Any serious threat to harm someone else.
  4. Steps must be taken to prevent a client from committing suicide.

All other disclosures and clinical information are completely confidential.

The client holds the privilege and must provide written permission for this information to be released by the therapist.

WHAT IS THE COST OF COUNSELING?

At Rahma Center the cost for 12 sessions are covered by default using Sadaqah and donation money. We intend to cater to the mental and psycho-spiritual wellness of our community by making high quality professional services accessible.

Your Payment: Du’a to the Muslim Ummah, the people doing the work in Rahma Center and to the counselors working with us!

Your Optional Payment: We encourage people to donate to the Rahma Center Community assistant program (CAP) to help cover therapy costs if they can.

WHAT IS MARRIAGE AND FAMILY COUNSELING?

Marriage and family therapists (typically referred to as MFTs or family therapists) are recognized by U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Health Resources and Services Administration, as one of the five core mental health professions along with psychiatrists, clinical psychologists, and clinical social workers. Marriage and family therapists are mental health professionals with a minimum of a master’s degree, two years supervised clinical experience and are licensed to independently diagnose and treat mental health and substance abuse problems.

MFTs treat individuals, couples and families. The unique feature you will find during treatment with an MFT is the therapist will focus on understanding your symptoms and diagnoses within interactions and relationships. The existing environment and context is given careful examination paying particular attention to the family system. MFTs treat individuals as well, but always from the perspective that “relationships matter.”

Research has shown that family-based interventions are as effective—and in many cases more effective—than alternative interventions. Studies suggest that family therapy is a preferred method of treatment for depression, substance abuse, alcoholism, relational discord problems, and child/adolescent challenges including suicide and high-risk behavior. Family therapy outcomes for severe mental illness include improved well-being, fewer medical illnesses, decreased medical care utilization, and increased self-efficacy.

WHAT DISTINGUISHES MFTS/FAMILY THERAPISTS FROM OTHER MENTAL HEALTH PROFESSIONALS?

The training of MFTs includes live supervision by experienced MFTs, which is unique among the behavioral health disciplines. This highly accountable training focuses on the heightened sensitivity between you and those in your environment (family members, coworkers, friends) and how these relationships can help or challenge you and your experienced problem areas.

While MFTs work with individuals, couples and families, they also have extensive training working with, and thinking about, problems in the context of our relationships.

What disorders are commonly treated by MFTs?

  • Depression, bipolar and other affective disorders
  • Conduct disorder and delinquency

 

  • Anxiety, dissociative, stress related disorders
  • Alcohol and drug related disorders
  • Childhood behavioral and emotional disorders
  • Sexuality issues
  • Attention-deficit, conduct and other emotional disorders of childhood/adolescence
  • Medical and eldercare family intervention services
  • Divorce adjustment and transition issues
  • Domestic violence
  • Eating disorders
  • Schizophrenia, schizotypal, and delusional disorders
  • Couples, marital, and relationship problems
  • Adjustment to physical illness
  • Gender and other adult personality disorders